It has been less than 100 years since women first donned trousers, and now it seems as though the gender divide is becoming even blurrier.
Men in skirts is becoming more of a trend, and fashion designers are combining men’s and women’s collections, creating a gender-neutral style that is flawlessly fluid.

Gender fluidity has become a major buzzword, and the days of clothes labelled as men’s or women’s may be long gone. Instead of being assigned a gender, clothes are being designed to suit both sexes.

A Unisex Generation

While mens designer clothes such as those available at https://www.ejmenswear.com/ will always remain incredibly popular, it seems that women won’t mind shopping in the boys’ department now. While gender-neutral collections are all the rage, women are also increasingly opting to shop at men’s stores to find the fit and cut they prefer.

The gender neutral fashion trend may seem to be a new one, but designers like Calvin Klein have long been promoting the androgynous form. Calvin Klein’s CK One scent was launched in 1994, and it blew people’s perceptions of perfume out the water. Klein also opted for far more androgynous styling in his clothing and in many ways was the pioneer of gender-neutral style.

The Menswear/Menswear Divide

When Louis Vuitton put Jaden Smith in a skirt in their Spring/Summer womenswear campaign, it seemed like the gender divide had finally fallen away. Men in skirts is a sight far less common than ladies in trousers, but there are a brave few who have tried it and are vociferous in their praise.

Many men have said that a skirt gives them more freedom and that they do not feel any less masculine when wearing one. When you consider that kilts, often the staple wear of burly Scotsmen, are essentially skirts, it is hard to imagine any more of a masculine figurehead.

Stars in the spotlight have largely broken down the gender divide in fashion. Whether it is Harry Styles’ signature skintight skinny jeans or Jaden Smith’s skirts, the world is sitting up and watching. In the future, men’s and women’s wear labels may fall away and be replaced simply by the brand and the size, leaving the wearer to decide what they want rather than having their gender determine it.